Posts Tagged ‘entrée’

When it comes to salmon and most oily fish, I think simple is better. I’m a big fan of grilled fish without a lot of embellishment, and I much prefer savory flavors to sweet with fish, although my mind may be changed next week when I am in the brilliant hands of Eric Ripert and company at the ne plus ultra of fancy fish restaurants, Le Bernardin.

Although I don’t make salmon as often as I should, this recipe is right up my alley. The marinade-slash-finishing sauce has just four ingredients: garlic, mustard, soy sauce and olive oil, which makes for a zesty albeit slightly too salty kick. We picked up a beautiful piece…


Barefoot Contessa Grilled Leg of Lamb

Mary may’ve had a little lamb, but we need a great big lamb to feed these hungry carnivores!

We have made this recipe countless times over the years, with varying results. The first variable involves marinating the meat. Often we get the bright idea to grill lamb too late in the day to be able to get the tenderizing benefit the yogurt marinade provides. One of the welcome upsides to this Barefoot project is that it makes me plan ahead, so when the recipe advises you to marinate the lamb overnight or up to three days, I can actually give the lamb a nice soak for a good seven or eight hours, rather than a scant…


Oh, if only you could’ve smelled my kitchen while this was cooking…

I can’t believe I’ve had this original cookbook for so many years and have never made this chicken. It’s preposterously easy. All you need is chicken (duh!), honey, soy sauce, and loads of minced garlic and fresh ginger root. Instead of using quartered chickens, I used thighs and drumsticks, which are popular with this crowd. And because I’ve left my brain back in the Hamptons during my short week here in Westport (I’m desperately hoping to bring said cerebellum home with me on Labor Day), I didn’t read the whole recipe through to find out that it’s supposed to marinate overnight. Now there’s…


Okay, so it was spaghetti with shrimp scampi…but I have to tell you it was exceptional spaghetti and it made the dish especially mouthwatering.

This is one of our weekday standbys. I keep cleaned, top-quality IQF Texas Toros in the freezer, so the dish takes less than half an hour from start to finish, and it’s a cinch to pull together on late Little League nights or when I’m not in the mood to make anything complicated. I usually have the rest of the ingredients on hand in the fridge and pantry ““ pasta, garlic, butter, lemons, olive oil, parsley, salt and pepper ““ so it’s often a last-minute dish for us….


I must admit I wasn’t exactly looking forward to making this recipe, chiefly because of the time-consuming frying process…times two for my ravenous crew. And although I like onion rings just fine, thankyouverymuch, I’ve never had one that would compel me to willingly stand over the stove and tend a pan of hot oil for half an hour.

That is, until now. Meet the Cornmeal Onion Ring.

Jake had been clamoring to make this dish for a couple of weeks now, and I finally gave in to that cute, pleading face. Together we cut the onions and soaked the rings in buttermilk for an hour. And then it must’ve been my lucky day, because David reluctantly…


Striped bass is a family favorite, so when we went to the funky aquaculture fish market at Cranberry Hole and found fresh stripers that had been caught that morning, we bit ““ hook, line and sinker.

Normally we grill it, and I make a topping I created a few years back out of a bounty of ripe tomatoes, onions, mint, parsley and a few other fresh ingredients. But this recipe, with shrimp and mussels, all roasted with a bouillabasse-like sauce in the oven, looked delish. When we found enormous Peruvian heads-on prawns at the store, we knew this recipe was meant to be. And it was also quite befitting that we finally saw Julie & Julia…


In one of my favorite scenes from the 1985 film Fletch, Chevy Chase as, well, Fletch, pays a visit to Gail Stanwyck at the tennis club and orders lunch: “I’ll have a Bloody Mary, a steak sandwich…and a steak sandwich, please.” If it was this truffled filet of beef sandwich? Heck I’d put two of ’em on Mr. Underhill’s bill too!

This is truly the magnum opus of steak sandwiches. A crunchy baguette slathered with truffle butter, then layered with medium-rare prime tenderloin slices, shaved parmesan and peppery baby arugula (followed by a Lipitor chaser!). There’s never a crumb left by my hearty carnivores when I make it.

Ina’s formula for cooking tenderloin is foolproof, and if…


Okay, okay, pipe down now. I know this recipe isn’t from one of Ina’s books per se, BUT…it’s from Anna Pump, whom Ina calls her mentor. Anna’s specialty food shop, Loaves and Fishes in Sagaponack, is beloved here in the Hamptons, and her fourth book, “Summer on a Plate,” even has an endorsement on the front from Ina, who says, “No one has inspired me more than Anna Pump…” So that kinda counts, right?

Plus how could I not share the dish that all seven diners (including guest diner Uncle Dan) gave the maximum five stars?

So here’s the scoop. Yesterday afternoon we wound up at the Friday Farmers Market in the Nick & Toni’s parking lot…


What a crowd pleaser! We served this with capellini tossed with a buttered-down version of the same lemon-butter sauce and the gang really enjoyed this easy dinner. Of course with the original recipe serving four, we tripled it so we would feed the hungry troops and we’d have leftovers for lunch. It took us a little over an hour to cook all that chicken, and with the increased frying time and sauce reduction time, we estimate it would take about 22 minutes to cook the original quantity of the recipe.

I had two chefs in the kitchen today, and they worked well both together and individually. First, they pounded the chicken breasts down to about 1/4″…